Creating Your Own Panoramic Photos Without A Panoramic Camera

Have you ever seen an impressive panoramic photo and thought, “I wish I had a camera that would take photos like that?” Fortunately, if you have a camera–you can take panoramics! This type of photography is easier than you think. All you need are a consistent series of photos and a process called “stitching”. There are several software programs available that include this tool. I prefer to use Microsoft Digital Image Suite.

Start out by setting up a tripod. A tripod is not required, but it does help in keeping your camera steady. Make sure the camera is mounted level to the ground or horizon and zoom out slightly more than you expect the image to appear. The reason for this is because stitching the photos together will require you to slightly crop the image as a final step.

Begin taking your photos from the left (or the right if you are from Europe!) Your first photo should target the extreme end of the scene you are trying capture. For the remaining photos, the thing to remember is to overlap the previous photo by about 30%. Later on, when you stitch these together, the software will automatically piece the series of images by detecting that overlap.

Have you ever seen an impressive panoramic photo and thought, “I wish I had a camera that would take photos like that?” Fortunately, if you have a camera–you can take panoramics! This type of photography is easier than you think. All you need are a consistent series of photos and a process called “stitching”. There are several software programs available that include this tool. I prefer to use Microsoft Digital Image Suite.

Start out by setting up a tripod. A tripod is not required, but it does help in keeping your camera steady. Make sure the camera is mounted level to the ground or horizon and zoom out slightly more than you expect the image to appear. The reason for this is because stitching the photos together will require you to slightly crop the image as a final step.

Begin taking your photos from the left (or the right if you are from Europe!) Your first photo should target the extreme end of the scene you are trying capture. For the remaining photos, the thing to remember is to overlap the previous photo by about 30%. Later on when you stitch these together, the software will automatically piece the series of images by detecting that overlap.

If creating panoramics is something you would like to try, here are a few hints:

  • Make sure not to adjust the zoom while snapping the series of photos.
  • Focus each shot exactly the same as the previous shot.
  • Use a tripod to make sure your photos are steady, level, and consistent with the horizon.
  • Avoid capturing a close moving object such as a person or car.
  • Refrain from using a polarized filter. This could affect the color of the sky across your final image.
  • Be consistent in the overlap of your photos.
  • Crop the final stitched image for a finished look.

Choosing A Digital Photo Frame

There are many factors to consider when buying a digital photo frame. In fact, there are so many models and so many different features that the decision can become a little overwhelming for some people. As with any purchase, you should consider how the product will be used and what the most desired features are for the people using the frame.

For some, the most important consideration is the look of the photo display. The goal is to get large, sharp images with vivid colors. If this is the main consideration, then look for a digital frame with high resolution. The common resolution choices are 640×480, 800×600 and 1024×768. These numbers represent the number of pixels per square inch. The higher the resolution, the sharper the image will be. The screen size is also a factor, but just remember that with two frames with the same size screen, the one with the higher resolution will provide better photo quality.

The display screen ratio refers to the ratio of the width to the height of the photo display. The majority of frames will have a ratio of 4:3 which displays a 4 x 6 inch photo without any distortion. Frames with a 16:9 ratio will display photos with a widescreen look and work well for displaying HD formatted photos.

For others, the ease of loading photos is a big concern. You may be looking for the easiest way to add lots of photos without much difficulty. If you plan to simply insert a memory chip with the photos, almost every frame would work. If you would prefer to transfer the photos wirelessly, then check into some of the newer models that include this feature.

Another feature to consider is the amount of internal memory, if any. If you want to be able to store photos on the device itself, look for a frame with internal storage. The range here will be start at about 16MB and go up from there.

There are many more advanced features to choose from if your needs and tastes go beyond simply displaying photos. If you are interested in browsing the internet or streaming music there is a frame for you. Some frames will edit photos for you, reducing red eye, adjust the brightness, etc. Choosing a digital photo frame is like getting the right Plasterers Brisbane to work for your home to make sure you are expecting the perfect touch in your walls.

Once you have your list of desired features together, you can check out your local camera, electronics and discounts stores. There are also a huge amount of digital frames available online, so you could do a quick search and compare to find the perfect frame. It is also a good idea to check out the reviews of people who have already purchased the product. Happy shopping.

Getting Started in Bird Photography

If you want to start photographing birds and want to get some decent shots, you are going to need some basic equipment. The first thing you will need to get is a decent digital SLR camera. You can use a compact camera but you will soon realize that you need to get a lot closer to the birds to fill the frame of the shot.

I, myself, like Canon but the best thing to do is have a look around at a few reviews of the different SLR cameras out there and then decide which one to go for. To start with I wouldn’t go for brand new unless you can afford it. eBay is a great place to look for second-hand cameras and believe me there are some fantastic bargains on there.

The next thing you are going to need will be a decent long focal length Telephoto lens. There are absolutely loads of these out there and for the beginner, it can be a daunting task to know which one to buy. The Canon EF 100-400mm L lens is one of the bird photographers favorite and if you search in Google you can see a review of this lens. This is a very good lens but can be out of the price range for most people just over £1,000 at the time of writing, especially if you are just starting out.

Another good lens which you can purchase for around half the price of the Canon lens on eBay is the Sigma 150-500mm which is also very good and a lot of bird photographers use this lens. It is again your choice as to which one to go for but I would definitely recommend that you review the lens from an unbiased site to make sure that it is the best one you can get for the price that you are paying.

The next thing you will need to buy is a tripod to stop camera shake which will blur your shots if the correct shutter speed isn’t selected (more on this on another post). Again which one you buy is your choice but you will need to think about the weight of the tripod, it needs to be quite lightweight as you may need to carry the tripod plus your camera over some great distances. It will also need to be very sturdy as you are going to get some knocks on it at some stage. Another thing you will need to consider is how low the tripod can be set as this can be very handy for taking photos of ducks on the water for example. Whichever one you choose make sure that it’s not too cheap because 9 times out of 10 you will end up having to buy another one. There are some good tripods from Redsnapper at reasonable prices, to be honest, I’m thinking of getting one of these myself.

OK, that is it, your basic kit for bird photography. You will always want to add to it as you go and you will read about this great lens that someone else is using. It is very addictive and you will find yourself wanting to buy the best kit that you can afford, but for now, this basic kit will be fine.